Scene Elements: The Scene’s Purpose

According to the craft masters, scenes should have a purpose (also called a mission, intention, focus, point, or function). In other words, it needs a reason for being in your story. This isn't the character's reason for entering the scene. (We'll get to that later.) This is your, the author's, reason for including the scene … Continue reading Scene Elements: The Scene’s Purpose

Scene Structure: Elements of a Scene

So what all goes into writing a scene? Let's find out. As mentioned in the first scene post, these posts are ordered from the macro to the micro (more or less), so this post is mostly another overview post: We're getting a sense of all the elements that make up a scene, with a focus … Continue reading Scene Structure: Elements of a Scene

Rhythm in Plotting: The bestseller’s best-kept secret – Part 1

Have you read The Bestseller Code*? The authors, Jodie Archer & Matthew L. Jockers, say that the two bestselling adult books of all time--Fifty Shades of Gray* and The Da Vinci Code*--share a "regular rhythmic beat" that no other books share, at least not as closely. Whether coincidence or not, don't you kind of want … Continue reading Rhythm in Plotting: The bestseller’s best-kept secret – Part 1

Character Introductions: Characterizing from the get-go

A character's first appearance in a story is a big opportunity to characterize.  Here are several ways to fulfill its potential. BRING CHARACTERS ON IN CHARACTER If you take home nothing else from this post, at least take this: bring characters on in character. "To introduce any given character effectively, you must first of all … Continue reading Character Introductions: Characterizing from the get-go